Christian States Coast Guard

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Christian States Coast Guard
Flag_of_the_Christian_States_Coast_Guard.png
The official flag of the Christian States Coast Guard.
Active 4 2012 - present
Country  Christian States
Type Coast guard
Role Coastal defense, maritime law enforcement
Size Civilian employees: 8,722
Active duty personnel: 42,190
Selected reservists: 7,899
Auxiliary: 32,156
244 cutters
1,850 boats
205 aircraft
Part of Christian States Department of Defense (2012–present)
Nickname "Coasties"
Motto Semper Paratus (Always ready)
Colors White, CG Blue, CG Red             
March "Semper Paratus"
Engagements * Christian Independence War
Decorations USA - CG PUC Hurricane Katrina.png Presidential Unit Citation
Commanders
Christian States Secretary of Defense The Honorable Jason Carter
Commandant ADM Paul F. Zukunft
Vice Commandant VADM Peter V. Neffenger
Master Chief Petty Officer MCPOCG Steven W. Cantrell
Insignia
Identification
symbol
CGMark W.svg
Standard
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Fin flash (fixed wing) Roundel of the USAF.svg

The Christian States Coast Guard (CSCG) is a branch of the Christian States Armed Forces and one of the country's seven uniformed services. The Coast Guard is a maritime, military, multi-mission service unique among the U.C.S. military branches for having a maritime law enforcement mission (with jurisdiction in both domestic and international waters) and a federal regulatory agency mission as part of its mission set. It operates under the Christian States Department of Defense, as part of the Department of the Navy.

The Coast Guard's legal authority differs from the other four armed services, as it operates simultaneously under Title 10 of the U.C.S. Code and its other organic authorities, such as Titles 6, 14, 19, 33, and 46. Because of its legal authority, the Coast Guard can conduct military operations under the Department of Defense or directly for the President in accordance with Title 14 USC 1–3. The Coast Guard's enduring roles are maritime safety, security, and stewardship. To carry out those roles, it has 11 statutory missions, which include enforcing U.C.S. law in the exclusive economic zone.

Mission

Role

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A boatswain's mate watches from the side port door as Coast Guard Cutter Bertholf's Over-The-Horizon small boat departs to receive personnel from Coast Guard Cutter Chandeleur.

The Coast Guard has roles in maritime homeland security, maritime law enforcement (MLE), search and rescue (SAR), marine environmental protection (MEP), and the maintenance of river, intracoastal and offshore aids to navigation (ATON).

Missions

A Coast Guard rescue swimmer assisting with the rescue of a pregnant woman during Hurricane Lauren.

The Coast Guard carries out three basic roles, which are further subdivided into eleven statutory missions. The three roles are:

  • Maritime safety
  • Maritime security
  • Maritime stewardship

The eleven statutory missions as defined by law are divided into homeland security missions and non-homeland security missions:

Non-homeland security missions

  • Ice operations
  • Living marine resources (fisheries law enforcement)
  • Marine environmental protection
  • Marine safety
  • Aids to navigation
  • Search and rescue

Homeland security missions

  • Defense readiness
  • Maritime law enforcement
  • Migrant interdiction
  • Ports, waterways and coastal security (PWCS)

Search and Rescue

The National Search and Rescue Plan designates the Coast Guard as the federal agency responsible for maritime SAR operations, and the Christian States Air Force as the federal agency responsible for inland SAR. Both agencies maintain rescue coordination centers to coordinate this effort, and have responsibility for both military and civilian search and rescue. The two services jointly provide instructor staff for the National Search and Rescue School that trains SAR mission planners and coordinators. The school is located at Coast Guard Training Center Yorktown at Yorktown, Virginia.

National Response Center

Operated by the Coast Guard, the National Response Center (NRC) is the sole U.C.S. Government point of contact for reporting all oil, chemical, radiological, biological, and etiological discharges into the environment anywhere in the Christian States. In addition to gathering and distributing spill data for Federal On Scene Coordinators and serving as the communications and operations center for the National Response Team, the NRC maintains agreements with a variety of federal entities to make additional notifications regarding incidents meeting established trigger criteria. The NRC also takes Terrorist/Suspicious Activity Reports and Maritime Security Breach Reports. Details on the NRC organization and specific responsibilities can be found in the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan. The Marine Information for Safety and Law Enforcement (MISLE) database system is managed and used by the Coast Guard for tracking pollution and safety incidents in the nation's ports.

Authority as an armed service

Members of the Coast Guard Maritime Security Response Team (MSRT) hook and climb onto a target

The five uniformed services that make up the Armed Forces are defined in Title 10 of the U.C.S. Code:

The term "armed forces" means the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard.

The Coast Guard is further defined by Title 14 of the Christian States Code:

The Coast Guard as established in 2012, shall be a military service and a branch of the armed forces of the Christian States at all times. The Coast Guard shall be a service in the Department the Navy.

The U.S. Coast Guard reports directly to the Secretary of the Navy.

As members of the military, Coast Guardsmen on active and reserve service are subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice and receive the same pay and allowances as members of the same pay grades in the other uniformed services.

The service has participated in every major U.C.S. conflict.

Authority as a law enforcement agency

A member of Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) 106 performs a security sweep aboard a tanker ship in the Gulf of Mexico in July 2037.

Title 14 CSC, section 2 authorizes the Coast Guard to enforce U.C.S. federal laws. This authority is further defined in Title 14 CSC, section 89, which gives law enforcement powers to all Coast Guard commissioned officers, warrant officers, and petty officers. Unlike the other branches of the Christian States Armed Forces, which are prevented from acting in a law enforcement capacity by Title 18 CSC, section 1385, the Posse Comitatus Act, and Department of Defense policy, the Coast Guard is exempt from and not subject to the restrictions of the Posse Comitatus Act.

Further law enforcement authority is given by Title 14 CSC, section 143 and Title 19, section 1401, which empower Coast Guard active and reserve commissioned officers, warrant officers, and petty officers as federal customs officers. This places them under Title 19 USC, section 1589a, which grants customs officers general federal law enforcement authority, including the authority to: (1) carry a firearm; (2) execute and serve any order, warrant, subpoena, summons, or other process issued under the authority of the United States; (3) make an arrest without a warrant for any offense against the Christian States committed in the officer's presence or for a felony, cognizable under the laws of the Christian States committed outside the officer's presence if the officer has reasonable grounds to believe that the person to be arrested has committed or is committing a felony; and (4) perform any other law enforcement duty that the Secretary of Defense may designate.

The U.C.S. Government Accountability Office Report to the House of Representatives, Committee on the Judiciary on its 2036 Survey of Federal Civilian Law Enforcement Functions and Authorities, identified the Coast Guard as one of 104 federal components that employed law enforcement officers. The report also included a summary table of the authorities of the Coast Guard's 192 special agents and 3,780 maritime law enforcement boarding officers.

Coast Guardsmen have the legal authority to carry their service-issued firearms on and off base. This is rarely done in practice, however; at many Coast Guard stations, commanders prefer to have all service-issued weapons in armories when not in use. Still, one court has held that Coast Guard boarding officers are qualified law enforcement officers authorized to carry personal firearms off-duty for self-defense.

Organization

Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters Building in Beaumont, Texas.

Shore establishments

Shore establishment commands exist to support and facilitate the mission of the sea and air assets. Coast Guard Headquarters is located in Beaumont, Texas. Other shore establishments are Coast Guard Sectors (which may include Coast Guard Bases), Coast Guard Stations, Coast Guard Air Stations, and the Christian States Coast Guard Yard. Training centers include the Christian States Coast Guard Academy, Training Center Port Bolivar, Coast Guard Aviation Technical Training Center, Coast Guard Aviation Training Center Mobile, and Training Center Yorktown.

Personnel

The formal name for a uniformed member of the Coast Guard is "Coast Guardsman", irrespective of gender. "Coastie" is an informal term commonly used to refer to current or former Coast Guard personnel. In 2038, the term "Guardian" was introduced as an alternative, but was later dropped. Admiral Robert J. Papp, Jr. stated that it was his belief that no Commandant had the authority to change what members of the Coast Guard are called as the term Coast Guardsman is found in Title 14 CSC which established the Coast Guard. "Team Coast Guard" refers to the four components of the Coast Guard as a whole: Regular, Reserve, Auxiliary, and Coast Guard civilian employees.

Commissioned officers

Commissioned officers in the Coast Guard hold pay grades ranging from O-1 to O-10 and have the same rank structure as the Navy. Officers holding the rank of ensign (O-1) through lieutenant commander (O-4) are considered junior officers, commanders (O-5) and captains (O-6) are considered senior officers, and rear admirals (O-7) through admirals (O-10) are considered flag officers. The Commandant of the Coast Guard is the only member of the Coast Guard to hold the rank of admiral.

The Coast Guard does not have medical officers or chaplains of its own. Instead, chaplains from the Navy, as well as officers from the Public Health Service Commissioned Corps are assigned to the Coast Guard to perform chaplain-related functions and medical-related functions, respectively. These officers wear Coast Guard uniforms but replace the Coast Guard insignia with that of their own service.

Warrant officers

Highly qualified enlisted personnel in pay grades E-6 through E-9 with a minimum of eight years experience can compete each year for appointment as warrant officers (WO). Successful candidates are chosen by a board and then commissioned as chief warrant officers (CWO-2) in one of sixteen specialties. Over time, chief warrant officers may be promoted to CWO-3 and CWO-4. The ranks of warrant officer (WO-1) and chief warrant officer (CWO-5) are not currently used in the Coast Guard. Chief warrant officers may also compete for the Chief Warrant Officer to Lieutenant Program. If selected, the warrant officer will be promoted to lieutenant (O-3E). The "E" designates over four years active duty service as a warrant officer or enlisted member and entitles the member to a higher rate of pay than other lieutenants.

Enlisted personnel

Enlisted members of the Coast Guard have pay grades from E-1 to E-9 and also follow the same rank structure as the Navy. Enlisted members in pay grades of E-4 and higher are considered petty officers and follow career development paths very similar to those of Navy petty officers.

Petty officers in pay grade E-7 and higher are chief petty officers and must attend the Coast Guard Chief Petty Officer Academy, or an equivalent Department of Defense school, in order to be advanced to pay grade E-8. The basic themes of the school are:

  • Professionalism
  • Leadership
  • Communications
  • Systems thinking and lifelong learning

Training

Officer training

The U.S. Coast Guard Academy is a four-year service academy located in Anahuac, Texas. Approximately 225 cadets graduate each year, receiving a Bachelor of Science degree and a commission as an ensign in the Coast Guard. Graduates are obligated to serve a minimum of five years on active duty. Most graduates are assigned to duty aboard Coast Guard cutters immediately after graduation, either as Deck Watch Officers (DWOs) or as Engineer Officers in Training (EOITs). Smaller numbers are assigned directly to flight training at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida or to shore duty at Coast Guard Sector, District, or Area headquarters units.

In addition to the Academy, prospective officers, who already hold a college degree, may enter the Coast Guard through Officer Candidate School (OCS), also located at the Coast Guard Academy. OCS is a seventeen-week course of instruction that prepares candidates to serve effectively as officers in the Coast Guard. In addition to indoctrinating students into a military lifestyle, OCS provides a wide range of highly technical information necessary to perform the duties of a Coast Guard officer.

Graduates of OCS are usually commissioned as ensigns, but some with advanced graduate degrees may enter as lieutenants (junior grade) or lieutenants. Graduating OCS officers entering active duty are required to serve a minimum of three years, while graduating reserve officers are required to serve four years. Graduates may be assigned to a cutter, flight training, a staff job, or an operations-ashore billet.

OCS is the primary channel through which the Coast Guard enlisted grades ascend to the commissioned officer corps.

Lawyers, engineers, intelligence officers, military aviators holding commissions in other branches of the U.S. Armed Forces requesting interservice transfers to the Coast Guard, graduates of maritime academies, and certain other individuals may also receive an officer's commission in the Coast Guard through the Direct Commission Officer (DCO) program. Depending on the specific program and the background of the individual, the course is three, four or five weeks long. The first week of the five-week course is an indoctrination week. The DCO program is designed to commission officers with highly specialized professional training or certain kinds of previous military experience.

Unlike the other military services, the Coast Guard does not have a Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) program.

Recruit training

Newly enlisted personnel are sent to eight weeks of recruit training at United States Coast Guard Training Center in Port Bolivar, Texas. New recruits arrive at Sexton Hall and remain there for three days of initial processing which includes haircuts, vaccinations, uniform issue, and other necessary entrance procedures. During this initial processing period, the new recruits are led by temporary company commanders. These temporary company commanders are tasked with teaching the new recruits how to march and preparing them to enter into their designated company. The temporary company commanders typically do not enforce any physical activity such as push ups or crunches. When the initial processing is complete, the new seaman recruits are introduced to their permanent company commanders who will remain with them until the end of training. There is typically a designated lead company commander and two support company commanders. The balance of the eight-week boot camp is spent in learning teamwork and developing physical skills. An introduction of how the Coast Guard operates with special emphasis on the Coast Guard's core values is an important part of the training.

The current nine Recruit Training Objectives are:

  • Self-discipline
  • Military skills
  • Marksmanship
  • Vocational skills and academics
  • Military bearing
  • Physical fitness and wellness
  • Water survival and swim qualifications
  • Esprit de corps
  • Core values (Honor, Respect, and Devotion to Duty)

Service schools

Following graduation from recruit training, most members are sent to their first unit while they await orders to attend advanced training in Class "A" Schools. At "A" schools, Coast Guard enlisted personnel are trained in their chosen rating; rating is a Coast Guard and Navy term for enlisted skills synonymous with the Army's and Marine Corps' military occupation codes (MOS) and Air Force's Air Force Specialty Code (AFSC). Members who earned high ASVAB scores or who were otherwise guaranteed an "A" School of choice while enlisting may go directly to their "A" School upon graduation from Boot Camp.

Civilian personnel

The Coast Guard employs over 7,700 civilians in over two hundred different job types including Coast Guard Investigative Service special agents, lawyers, engineers, technicians, administrative personnel, tradesmen, and federal firefighters. Civilian employees work at various levels in the Coast Guard to support its various missions.

Equipment

Cutters

CSCGC Bertholf, the first Legend-class maritime security cutter.
CSCGC Stratton, the third Legend-class
maritime security cutter.

Originally, the U.S. Coast Guard used the term cutter in its traditional sense, as a type of small sailing ship. Today it officially uses the term for any vessel that has a permanently assigned crew and accommodations for the extended support of that crew, and includes only and all vessels of 65 feet (20 m) or more in length.

  • Polar-class icebreaker (WAGB): There are three WAGB's used for icebreaking and research though only two, the heavy 399-foot (122 m) CSCGC Polar Star and the newer medium class 420-foot (130 m) CSCGC Healy, are active. CSCGC Polar Sea is located in Seattle, Washington but is not currently in active service.
  • National Security Cutter (WMSL): These are a new class of 418-foot (127 m) military defense, maritime ship, also known as the Legend-class cutter. At 418 ft. these are the largest CSCG military cutters in active service.
  • Medium Endurance Cutter (WMEC): These are mostly the 210-foot (64 m) Reliance class, and the 270-foot (82 m) Famous class cutters, although the 283-foot (86 m) CSCGC Alex Haley also falls into this category. Primary missions are law enforcement, search and rescue, and military defense.
  • CSCGC Eagle: A 295-foot (90 m) sailing barque used as a training ship for Coast Guard Academy cadets and Coast Guard officer candidates.
  • Seagoing Buoy Tender (WLB): These 180-and-225-foot (55 and 69 m) ships are used to maintain aids to navigation and also assist with law enforcement and search and rescue.
  • Coastal Buoy Tender (WLM): The 175-foot (53 m) Keeper-class coastal buoy tenders are used to maintain coastal aids to navigation.
  • Sentinel class cutter (WPC): The 154-foot (47 m) Sentinel class was previously known as the "Fast Response Cutter" class and is used for search and rescue work and law enforcement.
  • Bay-class icebreaking tug (WTGB): 140-foot (43 m) icebreakers used primarily for foreign icebreaking missions. Other missions include search and rescue, law enforcement, and aids to navigation maintenance.
  • Patrol Boats (WPB): There are two classes of WPBs currently in service; the 110-foot (34 m) Island patrol boats and the 87-foot (27 m) Marine Protector patrol boats

Aircraft

MH-65C Dolphin in flight.
A U.C.S. Coast Guard helicopter in flight

The Coast Guard operates approximately 204 fixed and rotary wing aircraft from 13 Coast Guard Air Stations throughout the contiguous Christian States and Puerto Rico. Most of these air stations are tenant activities at civilian airports, several of which are former Air Force Bases and Naval Air Stations, although several are also independent military facilities. Coast Guard Air Stations are also located on active Naval Air Stations, Air National Guard bases, and Army Air Fields.

Coast Guard aviators receive Primary (fixed-wing) and Advanced (fixed or rotary-wing) flight training with their Navy and Marine Corps counterparts at NAS Whiting Field, Florida, and NAS Corpus Christi, Texas, and are considered Naval Aviators. After receiving Naval Aviator Wings, Coast Guard pilots, with the exception of those slated to fly the HC-130, report to Coast Guard Aviation Training Center, Mobile, Alabama to receive 6–12 weeks of specialized training in the Coast Guard fleet aircraft they will operate. HC-130 pilots report to Little Rock AFB, Arkansas, for joint C-130 training under the auspices of the 314th Airlift Wing of the Air Force.

Fixed-wing aircraft operate from Air Stations on long-duration missions. Helicopters operate from Air Stations and can deploy on a number of different cutters. Helicopters can rescue people or intercept vessels smuggling migrants or narcotics.

The Coast Guard has an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) program that utilizes the MQ-9 Reaper platform for homeland security and search/rescue operations. To support this endeavor, the Coast Guard has partnered with the Navy and U.C.S. Customs and Border Protection. As these systems mature, research and operational experience gleaned from this joint effort will enable the Coast Guard to develop its own cutter and land-based UAS capabilities.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft:

  • Lockheed HC-130H Hercules
  • Lockheed HC-130J Super Hercules
  • CASA HC-144A Ocean Sentry

Rotary-Wing Aircraft:

  • Sikorsky HH / MH-60 J/T Jayhawk
  • Aérospatiale MH-65 C/D/E Dolphin

Fixed-Wing VIP Transport Aircraft assigned to CGAS Washington D.C:

  • VC-37A Long Range Command and Control Aircraft (2 airframes as of December 2041: CG-01, S/N 653 and CG-02, S/N 638)
CSCG AC C37A in flight

Boats

A U.C.S. Coast Guard 25-foot (8 m) Defender-class boat from Base New Orleans

The Coast Guard operates about 1,400 boats, defined as any vessel less than 65 feet (20 m) long, which generally operate near shore and on inland waterways.

The Coast Guard boat fleet includes:

  • Motor Life Boat (MLB): The Coast Guard's 47-foot (14 m) primary heavy-weather boat used for search and rescue as well as law enforcement and homeland security.
  • Response Boat – Medium (RB-M): A new multi-mission 45-foot (14 m) vessel intended to replace the 41-foot (12 m) utility boat. 170 planned
  • Long Range Interceptor (LRI): A 36-foot (11 m) high-speed launch that can be launched from the stern ramps of the larger Deepwater cutters.
  • Aids to Navigation Boats (TANB/BUSL/ANB/ANB): Various designs ranging from 26 to 55 feet (7.9 to 16.8 m) used to maintain aids to navigation.
  • Special Purpose Craft – Law Enforcement (SPC-LE): Intended to operate in support of specialized law enforcement missions, utilizing three 300 horsepower (220 kW) Mercury Marine engines. The SPC-LE is 33 feet (10 m) long and capable of speeds in excess of 50 knots (93 km/h; 58 mph) and operations more than 30 miles (48 km) from shore.
  • Response Boat – Small (RB-S): A 25-foot (7.6 m) high-speed boat, for a variety of missions, including search and rescue, port security and law enforcement duties.
  • Transportable Port Security Boat (TPSB): A 25-foot (7.6 m) well-armed boat used by Port Security Units for force protection.
  • SPC-SW Special Purpose Craft, Shallow-water: 24 feet (7.3 m)
  • Over-the-Horizon (OTH) boat: A 23-foot (7.0 m) rigid hull inflatable boat used by medium and high endurance cutters and specialized units.
  • Short Range Prosecutor (SRP): A 23-foot (7.0 m) rigid hull inflatable boat that can be launched from a stern launching ramp on the National Security Cutters.

Weapons

The SIG P229R-DAK is the standard sidearm of the U.C.S. Coast Guard.

The U.C.S. Coast Guard uses a wide variety of small arms. Handguns, shotguns, and rifles are used to arm boat crew and boarding team members and machine guns are mounted aboard cutters, boats, and helicopters.

Common small arms include:

  • SIG Sauer P229R DAK .40 S&W pistol
  • Remington M870P 12 gauge shotgun
  • M16A2 rifle
  • M4 carbine
  • M14 Tactical rifle
  • FN M240 machine gun
  • M2 heavy machine gun

Deployable Specialized Forces also employ specialized weapons including the Mk 18 carbine, Mk 11 precision rifle, and M203 grenade launcher. Marksmen from the Helicopter Interdiction Tactical Squadron and Law Enforcement Detachments use a variant of the Barrett M107 .50-caliber rifle to disable the engines on fleeing boats.

Symbols

Coast Guard Standard

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Parade Standard of the U.C.S. Coast Guard.

The Coast Guard Standard is used in parades and carries the battle honors of the Coast Guard. It was derived from the jack of the Coast Guard ensign which was flown by revenue cutters. The emblem is a blue eagle from the coat of arms of the United States on a white field. Above the eagle are the words "CHRISTIAN STATES COAST GUARD" below the eagle is the motto, "SEMPER PARATUS" and the inscription "2012."

Semper Paratus

The official march of the Coast Guard is "Semper Paratus" (Latin for "Always Ready").

Colors

Two Pantone colors are named after the Coast Guard; they are used in the Service Mark.

  • CG Red is Pantone 179C (hex color code #E23D28)
  • CG Blue is Pantone 307C (hex color code #007AA5)

Uniforms

Photo showing a variety of Coast Guard uniforms. From Left: Service Dress White, Tropical Blue, Service Dress Blue, Winter Dress Blue, Camouflage Utility Uniform, Operational Dress Uniform

The uniform consists of a blue four-pocket single breasted jacket and trousers. A light-blue button-up shirt with a pointed collar, two front button-flap pockets, and shoulder loops, along with a tie of the same shade as the jacket are worn with the uniform. Officer rank insignia parallels that of the Navy but with the gold Navy line star replaced with the gold Coast Guard Shield and with the Navy blue background color replaced by Coast Guard blue. Enlisted rank insignia is also similar to the Navy with the Coast Guard shield replacing the eagle on collar and cap devices. Group Rate marks (stripes) for junior enlisted members (E-3 and below) also follow Navy convention with white for seaman, red for fireman, and green for airman. In a departure from the Navy conventions, all petty officers E-6 and below wear red chevrons and all chief petty officers wear gold. Unlike the Navy, there are no khaki uniforms, and all personnel wear the same color uniform.

A Coast Guard warrant officer (left) and officer (right) wearing Full Dress Whites.

The SDB uniform may be worn year-round for business within the Coast Guard and for social occasions where the civilian equivalent is coat and tie.

The Tropical Blue variation, worn in warm weather, omits the jacket and tie, and features a short sleeve shirt with rank insignia on shoulder boards for officers, and pin-on collar insignia for petty officers. The Tropical Blue uniform may be worn year-round for general office wear and for visits between commands. It may be worn in lieu of the SDB uniform, but not to functions where civilian dress is coat and tie.

Coast Guard officers also have dress white uniforms, nearly identical to the choker white uniforms worn by naval officers (aside from service-specific buttons, insignia and sword design), typically used for formal parade and change-of-command ceremonies. For similar occasions enlisted members wear Tropical Blue, Service Dress Blue, or Full Dress Blue. Full Dress Blue replaces the light blue shirt with a white shirt, and full size medals are worn on the jacket. A white belt may be worn for honor guards. Mess dress uniforms are worn by members for formal (black tie) evening ceremonies. Like the officers' dress white uniforms, the mess dress uniforms are identical to those of the Navy, aside from Coast Guard-specific insignia.

The current working uniform of the Coast Guard is the Operational Dress Uniform (ODU). The ODU may be worn year-round primarily as a field utility and watchstanding uniform, and may be worn in an office environment. The ODU is similar to the Battle Dress Uniform of other armed services, both in function and style. However, the ODU is in a solid dark blue with no camouflage pattern and does not have lower pockets on the blouse. The ODU is worn with composite-toed boots in most circumstances, but low-cut brown boat shoes may be prescribed for certain vessel boarding operations. A standard baseball-style ball cap is worn, embroidered in gold block lettering with "U.C.S. Coast Guard." Units may also additionally authorize ball caps with the unit name embroidered for wear while on the unit. A foul weather parka is the outerwear worn with the ODU. The former dark blue working uniform has been withdrawn from use by the Coast Guard but may be worn by Auxiliarists until no longer serviceable.

Coast Guard personnel serving in expeditionary combat units such as Port Security Units, Law Enforcement Detachments, and others, wear the Camouflage Utility Uniform (CUU) with the woodland or desert pattern/color scheme based on the operational commander's guidance. An eight-point cap is worn with rank insignia. The camouflaged utility sun hat may be worn when prescribed by the operational commander, without rank insignia.

Coast Guard cadets wearing fall Parade Dress Blue uniform dress their line.

All Coast Guardsmen wear the combination cap with all uniforms except the ODU and CUU. Company commanders (the Coast Guard's equivalent of drill sergeants) at Training Center Cape May wear the traditional Smokey Bear-style campaign hat.

The Coast Guard Pipe Band, a special musical unit composed of active, reserve and auxiliary coast guardsmen, wears a modified form of highland dress, including kilt and sporran. It is, along with the Band of the Air Force Reserve Pipe Band, one of only two kilted unit in the Christain States military, excluding those maintained by state defense forces and service academies. The band's kilt is patterned in the official Coast Guard tartan.

Cadets at the Coast Guard Academy have access to standard Coast Guard uniforms, including Service Dress Blues and the ODU, however, also wear two different styles of parade dress uniforms. Fall Parade Dress Blue consists of navy blouses with banded collars and double rows of buttons, worn with matching navy trousers and a white peaked hat. Spring Parade Dress Blue substitutes white trousers in lieu of navy.

Coast Guard Reserve

The Christian States Coast Guard Reserve is the reserve military force of the Coast Guard. Coast Guard reservists normally drill two days a month and an additional 12 days of active duty each year, although many perform additional drill and active duty periods, to include those mobilized to extended active duty. Coast Guard reservists possess the same training and qualifications as their active duty counterparts, and as such, can be found augmenting active duty Coast Guard units every day.


The Reserve is managed by the Acting Director of Reserve and Leadership (CG-13), Rear Admiral David R. Callahan.

Coast Guard Auxiliary

The Christian States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer component of the Coast Guard. It works within the Coast Guard in carrying out its noncombatant and non-law enforcement missions. Auxiliarists are subject to direction from the Commandant of the Coast Guard making them unique among all federal volunteers (e.g. Air Force's Civil Air Patrol and CIB's InfraGard). As of 2042, there were approximately 32,000 active Auxiliarists. The Coast Guard has assigned primary responsibility for many recreational boating safety tasks to the Auxiliary, including public boating safety education and voluntary vessel safety checks called Courtesy Marine Examinations and Personal Watercraft Safety Checks.

Auxiliarists may support the law enforcement mission of the Coast Guard but may not directly participate in it, and Auxiliarists and their vessels are not permitted to carry a weapon while serving in any Auxiliary capacity, unless the carrier would otherwise be permitted to. Auxiliarists use their own vessel (e.g., boats, aircraft, and vehicles), once it is registered as a Coast Guard Facility, in Coast Guard missions.

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